Hall, Kathleen D

Email Address
ORCID
Disciplines
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Position
Introduction
Research Interests

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 6 of 6
  • Publication
    Reflections on the Field: Scientifically Debased Research on Learning, 1854–2006
    (2007-03-01) McDermott, Ray; Hall, Kathleen D
    By its emphasis on arbitrary standards and misleading systems of accountability, the No Child Left Behind Act has had deleterious effects on classroom practice, teacher education, and even educational research. The new constraints on educational research, driven by a logic of randomized field tests, are part of a larger and more invidious international managerialism that subordinates individual biographies to state-based bureaucratic control.
  • Publication
    The Ethnography of Imagined Communities: The Cultural Production of Sikh Ethnicity in Britain
    (2004-09-01) Hall, Kathleen D
    Ethnographers for nearly a century have been entering the everyday worlds of immigrants and their children to learn about the process of becoming American. We have studied immigration by "being there," by engaging in ethnographic encounters in the places where immigrants and their children live their everyday lives. Numerous classic ethnographies have been produced, yet studying immigration ethnographically could still be considered paradoxical. For while ethnographers traditionally attend to localized everyday experience, immigrant incorporation involves the interplay of transnational, national, and local processes.
  • Publication
    Scientifically Debased Research on Learning, 1854-2006
    (2007-03-01) McDermott, Ray; Hall, Kathleen D
    By its emphasis on arbitrary standards and misleading systems of accountability, the No Child Left Behind Act has had deleterious effects on classroom practice, teacher education, and even educational research. The new constraints on educational research, driven by a logic of randomized field tests, are part of a larger and more invidious international managerialism that subordinates individual biographies to state-based bureaucratic control.
  • Publication
    Science, Globalization, and Educational Governance: The Political Rationalities of the New Managerialism
    (2005-01-01) Hall, Kathleen D
    The modern school has been a critical site for imagining possible publics and publicly-defining national purposes. Public education is presumed to provide a collective good to "a public"—"a public" of which the discourse about educational purposes conjures and addresses. Yet the imagined publics and purposes of education have varied considerably at different historic junctures. These variations have been shaped in part by the rise and fall in prominence of two contrasting political horizons and the quite distinctive roles they have envisioned for the state and the market. The first, articulated in classic form by Adam Smith in the Wealth of Nations, privileges the role of the free market, arguing that state efforts to promote the social good are ineffectual compared to unbridled market forces. The second stresses the state's central role in protecting its citizens from the vicissitudes of the market by insuring social security and increased well-being.
  • Publication
    Until All Of Us Are Home: The Process of Leadership at Project H.O.M.E.
    (2006-03-01) Hall, Kathleen D
    "None of us are home until all of us are home." This is the motto of the not-for-profit organization Project H.O.M.E. (Housing, Opportunities for Employment, Medical Care, Education). These words, expressing the organization's commitment to solidarity in struggle, are permanently inscribed in a beautiful stone mosaic just inside the golden doors at the entrance of 1515 Fairmount, one of Project H.O.M.E.'s eleven residential facilities for formerly homeless men and women and the site of the outreach program and many of the administrative offices. Their motto is emblazoned on a banner raised high between the outstretched arms of a man and woman who stand before the golden doors of 1515 Fairmount. Above them is the skyline of Philadelphia, and below are listed the names of the many organizations - legal and governmental largely - that helped Project H.O.M.E. win its NIMBY ("Not in My Backyard") legal battle against neighborhood and city opposition to the opening of a residence for the formally homeless at 1515 Fairmount. "In gratitude to the efforts of these people," read the words at the bottom of the long list of law firms, businesses, and government officials, including "The Honorable Henry Cisneros, Secretary, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development."
  • Publication
    Until All Of Us Are Home: The Process of Leadership at Project H.O.M.E. A Leadership for a Changing World Collaborative Ethnography
    (2006-03-01) Hall, Kathleen D
    "None of us are home until all of us are home." This is the motto of the not-for-profit organization Project H.O.M.E. (Housing, Opportunities for Employment, Medical Care, Education). The words, expressing the organization's commitment to solidarity in struggle, are permanently inscribed in a beautiful stone mosaic just inside the golden doors at the entrance of 1515 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, one of Project H.O.M.E.'s 11 residential facilities for formerly homeless men and women and the site of the outreach program and many of the administrative offices. The motto serves as a reminder that the true struggle is to end homelessness and as a clarion call to bring all of us, all of humanity, home. This ethnography explores the process of shared leadership at Project H.O.M.E. We consider how leadership emerges through struggle and results in transformations, individual as well as social, in the context of personal struggles for recovery and family reunification, collective struggles for fair housing and equality, and administrative struggles to stay true to Project H.O.M.E.'s vision and pursue appropriate avenues for organizational growth. The information and analysis in this ethnography is based on a yearlong (July 2003 to October 2004) participatory study. In keeping with the aims of the Leadership for a Changing World program, the ethnographers, Kathleen Hall and Jaskiran Dhillon, together with documentary photographer Harvey Finkle and Project H.O.M.E.’s Director of Education and Public Policy, Laura Weinbaum, worked with members of the Project H.O.M.E. community to explore how leadership is understood, experienced, and enacted in everyday practice. Our research took an appreciative inquiry stance, in which we, as researchers, participated with members of the Project H.O.M.E. community to explore and learn lessons from the meanings they gave to their leadership work. Therefore, our account weaves their stories together with an analytic thread that illuminates the lessons the stories provide. For more information on Project H.O.M.E., go to www.projecthome.org. For information on the photographs, go to www.harveyfinkle.org.