Streaming Media

Location

Kleinman Center for Energy Policy at the University of Pennsylvania

Event Website

http://www.library.upenn.edu/exhibits/lectures/scienceinfo_program.html

Start Date

25-2-2017 11:30 AM

End Date

25-2-2017 12:45 PM

Document Type

Presentation

Description

Robert Kargon, Johns Hopkins University

The Geography of Knowledge: William Pepper, Jr. and the Advancement of Learning in Philadelphia 1870-1900

William Pepper, Jr. MD was the provost of the University of Pennsylvania and brought it and its medical school into the scientific age. Inspired by the successes of South Kensington's "Albertopolis" and by his role at the 1876 Philadelphia World's Fair, Pepper planned to create a knowledge city in Philadelphia, including advanced research and teaching institutions, laboratories, libraries, and museums.

Nader Vossoughian, New York Institute of Technology

Internationalism under National Socialism: Architects' Data and the Standardization of Knowledge (1933-1945)

The intimate ties between internationalist and pacifist movements in modern European history is fairly well-established. Lesser known, however, is the fact that fascist and imperialist governments have often affiliated themselves with internationalist and globalizing causes as well. Hendrik Christian Andersen appealed to Mussolini in an effort to realize the building of his World Center of Communication. Ernst Neufert appealed to Albert Speer and to Adolf Hitler in order to realize his dream of developing a universal language of design. He joined Speer's architectural office in 1938, he became an advisor to the Organisation Todt in 1942, and he headed DIN's (the German Institute for Standardization's) Construction Standards Committee between 1944 and 1945. Arguably, Neufert is best remembered today for authoring Architects' Data (Bauentwurfslehre). After eighty years, it is still the most influential standards handbook in the world. In this presentation, I document the genesis and evolution of this important publication. I concentrate on the graphic design and conceptual aims of the first edition. (I use it to explore the links between imperialism, modernism, and internationalism.) I historicize its 1943 and 1944 editions. (I show that these help flesh out Neufert's utopian aims and aspirations.) I narrate Neufert's stewardship of DIN's Construction Standards Committee. (This is in order to underline the links between internationalism, imperialism, and standardization.) I discuss the important role that standards continue to play in the organization of knowledge today. (I argue that we still need to historicize what some are calling the "Internet of things.")

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YouTube recording of Robert Kargon begins at 1:15:04.

YouTube recording of Nader Vossoughian begins at 1:46:02.

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Feb 25th, 11:30 AM Feb 25th, 12:45 PM

Session 6: Universalism by Design

Kleinman Center for Energy Policy at the University of Pennsylvania

Robert Kargon, Johns Hopkins University

The Geography of Knowledge: William Pepper, Jr. and the Advancement of Learning in Philadelphia 1870-1900

William Pepper, Jr. MD was the provost of the University of Pennsylvania and brought it and its medical school into the scientific age. Inspired by the successes of South Kensington's "Albertopolis" and by his role at the 1876 Philadelphia World's Fair, Pepper planned to create a knowledge city in Philadelphia, including advanced research and teaching institutions, laboratories, libraries, and museums.

Nader Vossoughian, New York Institute of Technology

Internationalism under National Socialism: Architects' Data and the Standardization of Knowledge (1933-1945)

The intimate ties between internationalist and pacifist movements in modern European history is fairly well-established. Lesser known, however, is the fact that fascist and imperialist governments have often affiliated themselves with internationalist and globalizing causes as well. Hendrik Christian Andersen appealed to Mussolini in an effort to realize the building of his World Center of Communication. Ernst Neufert appealed to Albert Speer and to Adolf Hitler in order to realize his dream of developing a universal language of design. He joined Speer's architectural office in 1938, he became an advisor to the Organisation Todt in 1942, and he headed DIN's (the German Institute for Standardization's) Construction Standards Committee between 1944 and 1945. Arguably, Neufert is best remembered today for authoring Architects' Data (Bauentwurfslehre). After eighty years, it is still the most influential standards handbook in the world. In this presentation, I document the genesis and evolution of this important publication. I concentrate on the graphic design and conceptual aims of the first edition. (I use it to explore the links between imperialism, modernism, and internationalism.) I historicize its 1943 and 1944 editions. (I show that these help flesh out Neufert's utopian aims and aspirations.) I narrate Neufert's stewardship of DIN's Construction Standards Committee. (This is in order to underline the links between internationalism, imperialism, and standardization.) I discuss the important role that standards continue to play in the organization of knowledge today. (I argue that we still need to historicize what some are calling the "Internet of things.")

https://repository.upenn.edu/science_of_information/sessions/session/8