Operations, Information and Decisions Papers

Document Type

Technical Report

Date of this Version

9-2016

Publication Source

Climatic Change

Volume

138

Issue

1-2

Start Page

353

Last Page

360

DOI

10.1007/s10584-016-1735-9

Abstract

Research reveals that liberals and conservatives in the United States diverge about their beliefs regarding climate change. We show empirically that political affiliation also matters with respect to climate related risks such as flooding from hurricanes. Our study is based on a survey conducted 6 months after Superstorm Sandy in 2012 of over 1,000 residents in flood-prone areas in New York City. Democrats’ perception of their probability of suffering flood damage is significantly higher than Republicans’ and they are also more likely to invest in individual flood protection measures. However, 50% more Democrats than Republicans in our sample expect to receive federal disaster relief after a major flood. These results highlight the importance of taking into account value-based considerations in designing disaster risk management policies.

Copyright/Permission Statement

© The Author(s) 2016. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Keywords

flood risk, flood damage, political affiliation, Republican party, flood insurance

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Date Posted:10 July 2018

This document has been peer reviewed.