Marketing Papers

Document Type

Technical Report

Date of this Version

1975

Publication Source

The Journal of Consumer Affairs

Volume

9

Issue

1

Start Page

15

Last Page

32

DOI

10.1111/j.1745-6606.1975.tb00546.x

Abstract

Early evaluations of Truth‐in‐Lending have observed impressive gains in consumer knowledge about interest rates. Contrary to original goals, consumers with more education, income, and debt experience have benefited far more than low‐income and minority consumers. How will these results change over time as consumers gain credit experience with the aid of disclosure? Has disclosure improved consumer understanding about finance charges, and what factors beyond socio‐economic status might have enhanced consumer knowledge of credit terms? These questions are addressed in this report of a large sample of California households surveyed at two points in time. The longitudinal analysis shows individual changes in knowledge, the effects of credit experience on learning, and a projection of future levels of credit knowledge.

Copyright/Permission Statement

This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [Brandt, W.K., Day, G.S., & Deutscher, T. (1975). Information Disclosure and Consumer Credit Knowledge: A Longitudinal Analysis. The Journal of Consumer Affairs 9, no. 1: pp. 15-32], which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1745-6606.1975.tb00546.x.

This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions at https://authorservices.wiley.com/author-resources/Journal-Authors/licensing-open-access/licensing/self-archiving.html

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Date Posted: 15 June 2018

This document has been peer reviewed.