Health Care Management Papers

Document Type

Technical Report

Date of this Version

6-2016

Publication Source

American Economic Review

Volume

106

Issue

6

Start Page

1244

Last Page

1277

DOI

10.1257/aer.20140308

Abstract

This paper uses data from the American Mathematics Competitions to examine the rates at which different high schools produce high-achieving math students. There are large differences in the frequency with which students from seemingly similar schools reach high achievement levels. The distribution of unexplained school effects includes a thick tail of schools that produce many more high-achieving students than is typical. Several additional analyses suggest that the differences are not primarily due to unobserved differences in student characteristics. The differences are persistent across time, suggesting that differences in the effectiveness of educational programs are not primarily due to direct peer effects.

Copyright/Permission Statement

Copyright ©2016 AEA.

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Date Posted: 27 November 2017

This document has been peer reviewed.