Communication with Kin in the Wake of the COVID-19 Pandemic

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Penn collection
Population Center Working Papers (PSC/PARC)
Degree type
Discipline
Communication
Subject
kinship
COVID-19
family communication
extended family relations
New York City
pandemic
social capital
crisis
family
Communication
Demography, Population, and Ecology
Family, Life Course, and Society
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Sociology
Funder
This study received support from the Population Research Training Grant (NIH T32 HD007242) awarded to the Population Studies Center at the University of Pennsylvania by the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH)’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.
Grant number
License
author or copyright holder retaining all copyrights in the submitted work
Copyright date
2023
Distributor
Related resources
Contributor
Abstract

This study investigates patterns of communication among non-coresident kin in the aftermath of a crisis – the COVID-19 pandemic – focusing on a representative sample of New York City residents from the Poverty Tracker survey. Over half of New Yorkers spoke to their non-coresident family members several times a week during the pandemic and nearly half reported that their communication with non-coresident kin increased since March 2020. Extended kin proved to be important with 27.57% of respondents reporting that they increased communication with at least one extended family member. However, the kin type that New Yorkers were most likely to report increased communication with were siblings, revealing the importance of these ties during times of crisis. Communication with kin varied by sociodemographic characteristics. Women spoke with family members outside of their household more frequently and had higher odds of reporting that their communication increased. There was little support for the oft-stated premise that disadvantaged families by race or social class display greater patterns of kin engagement. In fact, the findings point to the opposite conclusion that families with greater economic resources generally engage with both their nuclear and extended kin more frequently, illuminating patterns of inequality in access to kin resources that may extend well beyond the COVID-19 pandemic. Overall, this study sheds light on an important yet oft-neglected driver of intra- and inter-generational inequalities, namely access to kin ties as a form of social capital to be activated and leveraged when need arises.

Advisor
Date Range for Data Collection (Start Date)
Date Range for Data Collection (End Date)
Digital Object Identifier
Series name and number
Publication date
2023-09-06
Volume number
Issue number
Publisher
Publisher DOI
Journal Issue
Comments
Recommended citation
Collection

Version History

Now showing 1 - 2 of 2
VersionDateSummary
2*
2023-12-02 17:04:07
2023-05-23 00:35:50
* Selected version