Imperial Objects and Transpacific Subjects: Japan, China, and the United States at World's Fairs 1867-1915

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Degree type
PhD
Graduate group
History of Art
Discipline
Arts and Humanities
American Languages, Literatures, and Cultures
Subject
19th century
Asian American art history
world's fairs
Funder
Grant number
License
Copyright date
01/01/2022
Distributor
Related resources
Author
Qiu, Z. Serena
Contributor
Abstract

Imperial Objects and Transpacific Subjects explores the manifold constructions of transpacific empire as an accumulation of visual representations and political actions connecting the United States, China, and Japan at world’s fairs. My project serves two purposes. First, I propose that the control of representational legibility, the disciplinary function of new epistemologies, and the material reproduction of hegemonic ideologies were expositionary tools through which the United States, China, and Japan negotiated uneven distributions of political power. Second, I demonstrate how “Chinese” and “Japanese” were constructed as racial categories through compounding visual representations at and around world’s fairs. These racializations were contradictory, mutable, and inextricably intertwined with shifting visual understandings of indigenous, Black, and white populations that circulated the Pacific. Activating methods in Asian Americanist discourse, I explore the consequences of such “Chinese” and “Japanese” visibility in transpacific legislation, expansionist imperial capitalism, academic knowledge production, and the long afterlives of expositions.

Advisor
Leja, Michael
Date of degree
2022
Date Range for Data Collection (Start Date)
Date Range for Data Collection (End Date)
Digital Object Identifier
Series name and number
Volume number
Issue number
Publisher
Publisher DOI
Journal Issue
Comments
Recommended citation