Zhou, Wenchao

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Now showing 1 - 8 of 8
  • Publication
    Recursive Computation of Regions and Connectivity in Networks
    (2008-10-31) Taylor, Nicholas E; Zhou, Wenchao; Ives, Zachary G; Liu, Mengmeng; Loo, Boon Thau
    In recent years, data management has begun to consider situations in which data access is closely tied to network routing and distributed acquisition: sensor networks, in which reachability and contiguous regions are of interest; declarative networking, in which shortest paths and reachability are key; distributed and peer-to-peer stream systems, in which we may monitor for associations among data at the distributed sources (e.g., transitive relationships). In each case, the fundamental operation is to maintain a view over dynamic network state; the view is frequently distributed, recursive and may contain aggregation, e.g., describing transitive connectivity, shortest paths, least costly paths, or region membership. Surprisingly, solutions to this problem are often domain-specific, expensive to compute, and incomplete. In this paper, we recast the problem as one of incremental recursive view maintenance in the presence of distributed streams of updates to tuples: new stream data becomes insert operations and tuple expirations become deletions. We develop a set of techniques that maintain information about tuple derivability—a compact form of data provenance. We complement this with techniques to reduce communication: aggregate selections to prune irrelevant aggregation tuples, provenance-aware operators that can determine when tuples are no longer derivable and remove them from their state, and shipping operators that greatly reduce the tuple and provenance information being propagated while still maintaining correct answers. We validate our work in a distributed setting with sensor and network router queries, showing significant gains in bandwidth consumption without sacrificing performance.
  • Publication
    Provenance-Aware Declarative Secure Networks
    (2007-12-05) Zhou, Wenchao; Cronin, Eric; Loo, Boon Thau
    In recent years, network accountability and forensic analysis have become increasingly important, as a means of performing network diagnostics, identifying malicious nodes, enforcing trust management policies, and imposing diverse billing over the Internet. This has lead to a series of work to provide better network support for accountability, and efficient mechanisms to trace packets and information flows through the Internet. In this paper, we make the following contributions. First, we show that network accountability and forensic analysis can be posed generally as data provenance computations and queries over distributed streams. In particular, one can utilize provenance-aware declarative networks with appropriate security extensions to provide a flexible declarative framework for specifying, analyzing and auditing networks. Second, we propose a taxonomy of data provenance along multiple axes, and show that they map naturally to different use cases in networks. Third, we suggest techniques to efficiently compute and store network provenance, and provide an initial performance evaluation on the P2 declarative networking system with modifications to support provenance and authenticated communication.
  • Publication
    Fault Management in Distributed Systems
    (2010-01-05) Zhou, Wenchao
    In the past decade, distributed systems have rapidly evolved, from simple client/server applications in local area networks, to Internet-scale peer-to-peer networks and large-scale cloud platforms deployed on tens of thousands of nodes across multiple administrative domains and geographical areas. Despite of the growing popularity and interests, designing and implementing distributed systems remains challenging, due to their ever- increasing scales and the complexity and unpredictability of the system executions. Fault management strengthens the robustness and security of distributed systems, by detecting malfunctions or violations of desired properties, diagnosing the root causes and maintaining verifiable evidences to demonstrate the diagnosis results. While its importance is well recognized, fault management in distributed systems, on the other hand, is notoriously difficult. To address the problem, various mechanisms and systems have been proposed in the past few years. In this report, we present a survey of these mechanisms and systems, and taxonomize them according to the techniques adopted and their application domains. Based on four representative systems (Pip, Friday, PeerReview and TrInc), we discuss various aspects of fault management, including fault detection, fault diagnosis and evidence generation. Their strength, limitation and application domains are evaluated and compared in detail.
  • Publication
    Recursive Computation of Regions and Connectivity in Networks
    (2009-03-29) Liu, Mengmeng; Taylor, Nicholas E; Zhou, Wenchao; Ives, Zachary G; Loo, Boon Thau
    In recent years, the data management community has begun to consider situations in which data access is closely tied to network routing and distributed acquisition: examples include, sensor networks that execute queries about reachable nodes or contiguous regions, declarative networks that maintain information about shortest paths and reachable endpoints, and distributed and peer-to-peer stream systems that detect associations (e.g., transitive relationships) among data at the distributed sources. In each case, the fundamental operation is to maintain a view over dynamic network state. This view is typically distributed, recursive, and may contain aggregation, e.g., describing transitive connectivity, shortest paths, least costly paths, or region membership. Surprisingly, solutions to computing such views are often domain-specific, expensive, and incomplete. In this paper, we recast the problem as one of incremental recursive view maintenance in the presence of distributed streams of updates to tuples: new stream data becomes insert operations and tuple expirations become deletions. We develop a set of techniques that maintain compact information about tuple derivability or data provenance. We complement this with techniques to reduce communication: aggregate selections to prune irrelevant aggregation tuples, provenance-aware operators that can determine when tuples are no longer derivable and remove them from their state, and shipping operators that greatly reduce the tuple and provenance information being propagated while still maintaining correct answers. We validate our work in a distributed setting with sensor and network router queries, showing significant gains in communication overhead without sacrificing performance.
  • Publication
    Unified Declarative Platform for Secure Networked Information Systems
    (2009-03-29) Zhou, Wenchao; Loo, Boon Thau; Mao, Yun; Abadi, Martin
    We present a unified declarative platform for specifying, implementing, and analyzing secure networked information systems. Our work builds upon techniques from logic-based trust management systems, declarative networking, and data analysis via provenance. We make the following contributions. First, we propose the secure network datalog (SeNDlog) language that unifies Binder, a logic-based language for access control in distributed systems, and Network Datalog, a distributed recursive query language for declarative networks. SeNDlog enables network routing, information systems, and their security policies to be specified and implemented within a common declarative framework. Second, we extend existing distributed recursive query processing techniques to execute SeNDlog programs that incorporate authenticated communication among untrusted nodes. Third, we demonstrate that distributed network provenance can be supported naturally within our declarative framework for network security analysis and diagnostics. Finally, using a local cluster and the PlanetLab testbed, we perform a detailed performance study of a variety of secure networked systems implemented using our platform.
  • Publication
    Reduction-Based Security Analysis of Internet Routing Protocols
    (2012-01-01) Chen, Chen; Jia, Limin; Loo, Boon Thau; Zhou, Wenchao
    In recent years, there have been strong interests in the networking community in designing new Internet architectures that provide strong security guarantees. However, none of these proposals back their security claims by formal analysis. In this paper, we use a reduction-based approach to prove the route authenticity property in secure routing protocols. These properties require routes accepted and announced by honest nodes in the network are not tampered with by the adversary. We focus on protocols that rely on layered signatures to provide security: each route announcement is associated with a list of signatures attesting the authenticity of its subpaths. Our approach combines manual proofs with automated analysis. We define several reduction steps to reduce proving route authenticity properties to simple checks that can be automatically done by an automated tool Proverif. We show that our analysis is correct with respect to the trace semantics of the routing protocols.
  • Publication
    Maintaining Recursive Views of Regions and Connectivity in Networks
    (2010-08-01) Liu, Mengmeng; Taylor, Nicholas E; Zhou, Wenchao; Ives, Zachary G; Loo, Boon Thau
    The data management community has recently begun to consider declarative network routing and distributed acquisition: e.g., sensor networks that execute queries about contiguous regions, declarative networks that maintain shortest paths, and distributed and peer-to-peer stream systems that detect transitive relationships among data at the distributed sources. In each case, the fundamental operation is to maintain a view over dynamic network state. This view is typically distributed, recursive, and may contain aggregation, e.g., describing shortest paths or least costly paths. Surprisingly, solutions to computing such views are often domain-specific, expensive, and incomplete. We recast the problem as incremental recursive view maintenance given distributed streams of updates to tuples: new stream data becomes insert operations and tuple expirations become deletions. We develop techniques to maintain compact information about tuple derivability or data provenance. We complement this with techniques to reduce communication: aggregate selections to prune irrelevant aggregation tuples, provenance-aware operators that determine when tuples are no longer derivable and remove them from the view, and shipping operators that reduce the information being propagated while still maintaining correct answers. We validate our work in a distributed setting with sensor and network router queries, showing significant gains in communication overhead without sacrificing performance.
  • Publication
    Secure Time-Aware Provenance for Distributed Systems
    (2012-01-01) Zhou, Wenchao
    Operators of distributed systems often find themselves needing to answer forensic questions, to perform a variety of managerial tasks including fault detection, system debugging, accountability enforcement, and attack analysis. In this dissertation, we present Secure Time-Aware Provenance (STAP), a novel approach that provides the fundamental functionality required to answer such forensic questions – the capability to “explain” the existence (or change) of a certain distributed system state at a given time in a potentially adversarial environment. This dissertation makes the following contributions. First, we propose the STAP model, to explicitly represent time and state changes. The STAP model allows consistent and complete explanations of system state (and changes) in dynamic environments. Second, we show that it is both possible and practical to efficiently and scalably maintain and query provenance in a distributed fashion, where provenance maintenance and querying are modeled as recursive continuous queries over distributed relations. Third, we present security extensions that allow operators to reliably query provenance information in adversarial environments. Our extensions incorporate tamper-evident properties that guarantee eventual detection of compromised nodes that lie or falsely implicate correct nodes. Finally, the proposed research results in a proof-of-concept prototype, which includes a declarative query language for specifying a range of useful provenance queries, an interactive exploration tool, and a distributed provenance engine for operators to conduct analysis of their distributed systems. We discuss the applicability of this tool in several use cases, including Internet routing, overlay routing, and cloud data processing.