Departmental Papers (Religious Studies)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

2009

Publication Source

Jewish Quarterly Review

Volume

99

Issue

1

Start Page

1

Last Page

5

DOI

10.1353/jqr.0.0029

Abstract

Jewish Late Antiquity is a notoriously difficult period to see clearly; not only is the evidence sparse and idiosyncratic but the stakes are high and our lenses are perennially clouded. After all, the first centuries of the Common Era are the cradle of both Christianity and classical Judaism. The significance of this era is of intense and decidedly proprietary interest to many contemporary scribes no less than it was to ancient polemicists and practitioners. The methodological and confessional biases that inform the history of this period are, if not different in kind, then perhaps distinguished in degree from those that inflect all historical endeavors. The dangers posed, while hardly new to the field, are nonetheless persistent: we still need to sort out the very language and terms with which we do our work.

Copyright/Permission Statement

All rights reserved. Except for brief quotations used for purposes of scholarly citation, none of this work may be reproduced in any form by any means without written permission from the publisher. For information address the University of Pennsylvania Press, 3905 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-4112.

Keywords

Natalie B. Dohrmann, Classical Judaism, Common Era, Jewish Late Antiquity, Formative Judaism

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Date Posted: 08 September 2017

This document has been peer reviewed.