Departmental Papers (ASC)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

2009

Publication Source

Television & New Media

Volume

10

Issue

1

Start Page

46

Last Page

48

DOI

10.1177/1527476408325722

Abstract

As I suspect is true for most media studies scholars, there are many things on my “wish list” for our field: a greater appreciation of the political relevance of what, at least in most quantitative studies of political communication, is too quickly dismissed as “mere” entertainment or popular culture; a more sophisticated conceptualization of politics and power within cultural studies approaches to media; a more critical sensibility to how we approach our research; a greater emphasis on the larger economic, cultural, political, and technological environments within which communication occurs; more comparative and global research; a better understanding of how new media technologies are fundamentally changing communicative relationships; more research that finds its way into larger public, policy maker, and advocacy discourse about the role of the media in a democratic society; and so on.

Copyright/Permission Statement

The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Television & New Media, 10(1), © SAGE Publications, Inc. 2009 at the Television & New Media page: http://tvn.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/

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Date Posted: 03 May 2013

This document has been peer reviewed.