Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

1-1-2000

Publication Source

Compendium on Continuing Education for the Practicing Veterinarian

Volume

22

Issue

1

Start Page

74-79, 96

Abstract

The clinical appearance of hyphema is variable and is influenced by the volume of blood and the amount of time erythrocytes are present in the anterior chamber. When hyphema is evident, a complete history should be obtained and a thorough physical examination performed to direct the initial selection of diagnostic tests. Secondary complications of hyphema include glaucoma, synechiae, cataract formation, blood-staining of the cornea, and blindness. Frequent measurement of intraocular pressure is recommended. The two primary management issues in animals with hyphema are prevention of secondary hemorrhage (by treating the underlying disease) and control of secondary glaucoma.

Comments

Dr. Komáromy was affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania from 2003-2012.

Part I can be found at http://repository.upenn.edu/vet_papers/51/

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Date Posted: 20 November 2013

This document has been peer reviewed.