Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

11-1-1999

Publication Source

Compendium on Continuing Education for the Practicing Veterinarian

Volume

21

Issue

11

Start Page

1064

Last Page

1069

Abstract

Hemorrhage in the anterior chamber of the eye, or hyphema, results from a breakdown of the blood-ocular barrier (BOB) and is frequently associated with inflammation of the iris, ciliary body, or retina. Hyphema can also occur by retrograde blood flow into the anterior chamber via the aqueous humor drainage pathways without BOB breakdown. Hyphema attributable to blunt or perforating ocular trauma is more common than that resulting from endogenous causes. When trauma has been eliminated as a possible cause, it is prudent to assume that every animal with hyphema has a serious systemic disease until proven otherwise.

Comments

Dr. Komáromy was affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania from 2003-2012.

Part II can be found at http://repository.upenn.edu/vet_papers/52/

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Date Posted: 20 November 2013

This document has been peer reviewed.