Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

1-1-2001

Publication Source

Cell Transplantation

Volume

10

Issue

3

Start Page

317

Last Page

327

DOI

10.3727/000000001783986710

Abstract

A posterior segment approach for cell transplantation or injection into the subretinal space of the dog has been developed. Controlled penetration to the subretinal space was achieved using a 29-gauge injection cannula, either blunted or with a 30° sharpened bevel, and partially ensheathed with moveable plastic tubing. Depending on the injection volume used, the retina detached, and the fluid was reabsorbed within 1–3 weeks, although for smaller volumes the retina reattached within a matter of days. The optimal injection volume used was between 100 and 150 μl, or two injections of 55 μl each. By ophthalmoscopy following the surgery, it was possible to serially monitor the injection site and retinal bleb through fundus photography. Light microscopy demonstrates the distribution of stable, viable RPE cells in the subretinal space up to 6 months. The transplantation technique developed for the dog is atraumatic and free from any major surgical or clinical complications. It can be readily used to deliver cells or fluids to localized regions of the subretinal space.

Copyright/Permission Statement

Copyright © 2001 Cognizant Comm. Corp. www.cognizantcommunication.com

Keywords

animal model, dog, posterior segment, retinal pigment epithelial transplantation, subretinal injection, retinitis pigmentosa

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Date Posted: 20 August 2013

This document has been peer reviewed.