Statistics Papers

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

4-27-2004

Publication Source

PNAS

Volume

101

Issue

17

Start Page

6445

Last Page

6449

DOI

10.1073/pnas.0401314101

Abstract

Colocalization of proteins that are part of the same signal transduction pathway via compartmentalization, scaffold, or anchor proteins is an essential aspect of the signal transduction system in eukaryotic cells. If interaction must occur via free diffusion, then the spatial separation between the sources of the two interacting proteins and their degradation rates become primary determinants of the time required for interaction. To understand the role of such colocalization, we create a mathematical model of the diffusion based protein–protein interaction process. We assume that mRNAs, which serve as the sources of these proteins, are located at different positions in the cytoplasm. For large cells such as Drosophila oocytes we show that if the source mRNAs were at random locations in the cell rather than colocalized, the average rate of interactions would be extremely small, which suggests that localization is needed to facilitate protein interactions and not just to prevent cross-talk between different signaling modules.

Copyright/Permission Statement

Copyright 2004 National Academy of Sciences.

Keywords

protein diffusion, protein mobility, intracellular reaction, protein localization

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Date Posted: 27 November 2017

This document has been peer reviewed.