Streaming Media

Location

Kleinman Center for Energy Policy at the University of Pennsylvania

Event Website

http://www.library.upenn.edu/exhibits/lectures/scienceinfo_program.html

Start Date

24-2-2017 11:15 AM

End Date

24-2-2017 12:30 PM

Document Type

Presentation

Description

Teresa Davis, Princeton University

Universalism at the Margins: Codifying International Law in South America, 1889-1930

Between 1888 and 1928 the American continent saw widespread mobilization amongst North and South American jurists to codify private international law, that is, the set of rules and conventions governing the international relationships between private persons--whether individuals or corporations--and between these persons and the state. Coming as it did at a moment of increasing expansion of US trade and investment in Latin America, this was perhaps the world's first conversation between "north" and "south" over the rules governing the international economy. As such, the intellectual debates over private international law that took place across the Americas in this period raise key questions about the relationship between international mobility, sovereignty and economic development. At the center of the debate was the encounter between a utopian, "scientific" vision of a universal code, promoted by jurists affiliated with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, on the one hand, and, on the other, projects which sought to preserve a wide margin of sovereign power, even as they strove to promote investment and trade through the gradual establishment of clear international rules.

Eva Hemmungs Wirtén, University of Linköping

A Dangerous Utopia: the Curious Case of Scientific Property

When the League of Nation's Commission Internationale de Coopération Intellectuelle (CICI) had its first meeting in Geneva in 1922, the members of the group quickly identified three topics of special importance. Interuniversity relations, bibliography, and intellectual property were considered so crucial to the group's mandate -- securing future peace by international collaboration -- that they warranted the setting up of separate sub-committees. In her talk, Eva Hemmungs Wirtén will take the CICI's controversial report on scientific property, written by the Italian Senator Ruffini in 1923, as her starting point for a discussion on the role of intellectual property in the context of the CICI and beyond. Looking ahead, she will especially consider how the sciences of information and utopian internationalist movements may provide a creative framing for a new kind of intellectual property history: the bibliographical history of patents.

Comments

YouTube recording of Teresa Davis begins at 40:42.

YouTube recording of Eva Hummungs Wirtén begins at 1:12:24.

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Feb 24th, 11:15 AM Feb 24th, 12:30 PM

Session 2: Codifying Universalism

Kleinman Center for Energy Policy at the University of Pennsylvania

Teresa Davis, Princeton University

Universalism at the Margins: Codifying International Law in South America, 1889-1930

Between 1888 and 1928 the American continent saw widespread mobilization amongst North and South American jurists to codify private international law, that is, the set of rules and conventions governing the international relationships between private persons--whether individuals or corporations--and between these persons and the state. Coming as it did at a moment of increasing expansion of US trade and investment in Latin America, this was perhaps the world's first conversation between "north" and "south" over the rules governing the international economy. As such, the intellectual debates over private international law that took place across the Americas in this period raise key questions about the relationship between international mobility, sovereignty and economic development. At the center of the debate was the encounter between a utopian, "scientific" vision of a universal code, promoted by jurists affiliated with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, on the one hand, and, on the other, projects which sought to preserve a wide margin of sovereign power, even as they strove to promote investment and trade through the gradual establishment of clear international rules.

Eva Hemmungs Wirtén, University of Linköping

A Dangerous Utopia: the Curious Case of Scientific Property

When the League of Nation's Commission Internationale de Coopération Intellectuelle (CICI) had its first meeting in Geneva in 1922, the members of the group quickly identified three topics of special importance. Interuniversity relations, bibliography, and intellectual property were considered so crucial to the group's mandate -- securing future peace by international collaboration -- that they warranted the setting up of separate sub-committees. In her talk, Eva Hemmungs Wirtén will take the CICI's controversial report on scientific property, written by the Italian Senator Ruffini in 1923, as her starting point for a discussion on the role of intellectual property in the context of the CICI and beyond. Looking ahead, she will especially consider how the sciences of information and utopian internationalist movements may provide a creative framing for a new kind of intellectual property history: the bibliographical history of patents.

https://repository.upenn.edu/science_of_information/sessions/session/4