Real Estate Papers

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

7-2010

Publication Source

Forum for Health Economics & Policy

Volume

13

Issue

2

DOI

10.2202/1558-9544.1209

Abstract

This paper investigates the link between various risk factors, including socioeconomic status (SES), and the spread of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in Hong Kong in 2003. A comprehensive data set compiled by the author shows a negative and significant correlation between SARS incidence and various measures of income, but not years of education, unlike previous studies on other health conditions. The income-SARS gradient can be accounted for by controlling for pre-SARS housing values but not an array of measurable living conditions. Areas with more white-collar workers experienced a higher incidence rate, largely driven by the share of service and sales workers, after controlling for SES. These results have implications for the understanding of the SES-health link in the context of a contagious disease, the potential causality of the SES-SARS relationship and for future SARS containment strategies.

Copyright/Permission Statement

The final publication is available at www.degruyter.com

Keywords

socioeconomic status, infectious diseases, health, SARS, SES, health gradient

Share

COinS
 

Date Posted: 27 November 2017

This document has been peer reviewed.