Real Estate Papers

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

1-2009

Publication Source

Economic Geography

Volume

85

Issue

1

Start Page

23

Last Page

47

DOI

10.1111/j.1944-8287.2008.01002.x

Abstract

This article examines the association between one of the most basic institutional forms, the family, and a series of demographic, educational, social, and economic indicators across regions in Europe. Using Emmanuel Todd's classification of medieval European family systems, we identify potential links between family types and regional disparities in household size, educational attainment, social capital, labor participation, sectoral structure, wealth, and inequality. The results indicate that medieval family structures seem to have influenced European regional disparities in virtually every indicator that we considered. That these links remain, despite the influence of the modern state and population migration, suggests that such structures are either extremely resilient or in the past were internalized within other social and economic institutions as they developed.

Copyright/Permission Statement

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Duranton, G., Rodríguez-Pose, A. and Sandall, R. (2009), Family Types and the Persistence of Regional Disparities in Europe. Economic Geography, 85: 23–47., which has been published in final form at doi: 10.1111/j.1944-8287.2008.01002.x. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-820227.html#terms.

Comments

At the time of publication, author Gilles Duranton was affiliated with the University of Toronto. Currently, he is a faculty member at the Real Estate Department at the University of Pennsylvania.

Keywords

institutions, family types, education, social capital, labor force participation, economic wealth and dynamism, regions, Europe

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Date Posted: 27 November 2017

This document has been peer reviewed.