PARC Working Paper Series

Document Type

Working Paper

Date of this Version

1-1997

Comments

Recommended citation:

Preston, Samuel H., Mark E. Hill, and Greg L. Drevenstedt. 1997. "Childhood Conditions that Predict Survival to Advanced Ages Among African Americans." PARC Working Paper Series, WPS 97-03.

This working paper was published in a journal:

Preston, Samuel H., Mark E. Hill, and Greg L. Drevenstedt. 1998. "Childhood Conditions That Predict Survival to Advanced Ages Among African-Americans." Social Science & Medicine 47(9):1231-1246. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0277-9536(98)00180-4.

Abstract

This paper investigates the social and economic circumstances of childhood that predict the probability of survival to age 85. It uses a unique study design in which survivors are linked to their records in U.S. Censuses of 1900 and 1910. A control group of age and race-matched children is drawn from Public Use Samples for these censuses. It concludes that the factors most predictive of survival are farm background, having literate parents, and living in a two-parent household. Results support the interpretation that death risks are positively correlated over the life cycle.

Keywords

cohort mortality, longevity, African Americans, socioeconomic factors, geographic factors, oldest old

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Date Posted: 28 February 2020