Operations, Information and Decisions Papers

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

9-2008

Publication Source

Journal of Applied Psychology

Volume

93

Issue

5

Start Page

1165

Last Page

1173

DOI

10.1037/0021-9010.93.5.1165

Abstract

Across 2 experiments, the authors demonstrate that emotional states influence how receptive people are to advice. The focus of these experiments is on incidental emotions, emotions triggered by a prior experience that is irrelevant to the current situation. The authors demonstrate that people who feel incidental gratitude are more trusting and more receptive to advice than are people in a neutral emotional state, and people in a neutral state are more trusting and more receptive to advice than are people who feel incidental anger. In these experiments, greater receptivity to advice increased judgment accuracy. People who felt incidental gratitude were more accurate than were people in a neutral state, and people in a neutral state were more accurate than were people who felt incidental anger. The results offer insight into how people use advice, and the authors identify conditions under which leaders, policy makers, and advisors may be particularly influential.

Copyright/Permission Statement

This article may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.

Keywords

advice taking, emotions, gratitude, anger, trust

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Date Posted: 27 November 2017