Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

5-2013

Publication Source

Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners

Volume

25

Issue

5

Start Page

272

Last Page

279

DOI

10.1111/j.1745-7599.2012.00784.x

Abstract

Purpose

To identify the best screening measure of daytime sleepiness in adults with heart failure (HF).

Data sources

A total of 280 adults with HF completed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, the Stanford Sleepiness Scale, and a single Likert item measuring daytime sleepiness. The sensitivity and specificity of these self-report measures were assessed in relation to a measure of daytime dysfunction from poor sleep quality.

Conclusions

Only 16% of the sample reported significant daytime dysfunction because of poor sleep quality. Those reporting daytime dysfunction were likely to be younger (p < .001), to be unmarried (p = .002), to have New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class IV HF (p = .015), and to report low income (p = .006) and fewer hours of sleep (p = .015). The measure of daytime sleepiness that was most sensitive to daytime dysfunction was a single Likert item measured on a 10-point (1–10) scale. Patients with a score ≥4 were 2.4 times more likely to have daytime dysfunction than those with a score <4.

Implications for practice

Complaints of daytime dysfunction because of poor sleep are not common in adults with HF. Routine use of a single question about daytime sleepiness can help nurse practitioners to identify those HF patients with significant sleep issues that may require further screening.

Copyright/Permission Statement

This is the peer reviewed version of the article which has been published in final form at 10.1111/j.1745-7599.2012.00784.x. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving

Keywords

heart failure, screening, sleep disorders, outcomes

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Date Posted: 01 June 2016

This document has been peer reviewed.