Neuroethics Publications

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

2014

Publication Source

Nature Reviews Neuroscience

Volume

15

Start Page

123

Last Page

131

DOI

10.1038/nrn3665

Abstract

Functional MRI (fMRI)-based lie detection has been marketed as a tool for enhancing personnel selection, strengthening national security and protecting personal reputations, and at least three US courts have been asked to admit the results of lie detection scans as evidence during trials. How well does fMRI-based lie detection perform, and how should the courts, and society more generally, respond? Here, we address various questions — some of which are based on a meta-analysis of published studies — concerning the scientific state of the art in fMRI-based lie detection and its legal status, and discuss broader ethical and societal implications. We close with three general policy recommendations.

Comments

Correction for the published paper, 19 Feb. 2014:

An incorrect paper was cited as reference 2 of this article. The correct paper is Ganis, G., Rosenfeld, J. P., Meixner, J., Kievit, R. A. & Schendan, H. E. Lying in the scanner: covert countermeasures disrupt deception detection by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Neuroimage 55, 312–319 (2011). This has been corrected in the online version.

doi:10.1038/nrn3702

Keywords

fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging, functional MRI, lie detection

 

Date Posted: 15 May 2015

This document has been peer reviewed.