Neuroethics Publications

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

1-1-2014

Publication Source

Brain Topography

Volume

27

Issue

1

Start Page

33

Last Page

45

DOI

10.1007/s10548-013-0296-8

Abstract

In recent years, non-pharmacologic approaches to modifying human neural activity have gained increasing attention. One of these approaches is brain stimulation, which involves either the direct application of electrical current to structures in the nervous system or the indirect application of current by means of electromagnetic induction. Interventions that manipulate the brain have generally been regarded as having both the potential to alleviate devastating brain-related conditions and the capacity to create unforeseen and unwanted consequences. Hence, although brain stimulation techniques offer considerable benefits to society, they also raise a number of ethical concerns. In this paper we will address various dilemmas related to brain stimulation in the context of clinical practice and biomedical research. We will survey current work involving deep brain stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. We will reflect upon relevant similarities and differences between them, and consider some potentially problematic issues that may arise within the framework of established principles of medical ethics: nonmaleficence and beneficence, autonomy, and justice.

Copyright/Permission Statement

The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10548-013-0296-8

Comments

This is one of several papers published together in Brain Topography on the ‘‘Special Topic: Clinical and Ethical Implications of Neuromodulation Techniques”.

Keywords

neuroethics, medical ethics, brain stimulation, deep brain stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation

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Date Posted: 16 February 2015

This document has been peer reviewed.