Document Type

Review

Date of this Version

1972

Publication Source

The Journal of American Folklore

Volume

85

Issue

335

Start Page

82

Last Page

84

DOI

10.2307/539134

Abstract

While formalism and structuralism became key concepts in linguistics, literary criticism, and the social sciences during the first half of the twentieth century, they appeared in folklore research only in the late fifties and early sixties, as a direct result of the publication of Claude Lévi-Strauss' "The Structural Study of Myth" (Journal of American Folklore, 68 [1955], 428-444) and the 1958 translation of Propp's Morfologija skazki (Moscow-Leningrad, 1928). Since then, structural studies in folklore have multiplied by the dozens, encompassing such genres as proverbs, riddles, ballads, and chants. Alan Dundes and Edmund Leach were among the first to elaborate upon the research of their predecessors, applying, respectively, the theories of Propp and Lévi-Strauss to new bodies of literature, and developing new analytical methods.

Copyright/Permission Statement

Published as Review by Ben-Amos, D. Reviewed work: Formal or Structural Studies of Traditional Tales: The Usefulness of Some Methodological Proposals Advanced by Vladimir Propp, Alan Dundes, Claude Lévi-Strauss and Edmund Leach. The Journal of American Folklore 85(335), 82-82. © 1972 by the American Folklore Society.

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Date Posted: 22 September 2017

This document has been peer reviewed.