Management Papers

Document Type

Technical Report

Date of this Version

5-2009

Publication Source

Journal of Experimental Social Psychology

Volume

45

Issue

3

Start Page

594

Last Page

597

DOI

10.1016/j.jesp.2009.02.004

Abstract

The opportunity to profit from dishonesty evokes a motivational conflict between the temptation to cheat for selfish gain and the desire to act in a socially appropriate manner. Honesty may depend on self-control given that self-control is the capacity that enables people to override antisocial selfish responses in favor of socially desirable responses. Two experiments tested the hypothesis that dishonesty would increase when people's self-control resources were depleted by an initial act of self-control. Depleted participants misrepresented their performance for monetary gain to a greater extent than did non-depleted participants (Experiment 1). Perhaps more troubling, depleted participants were more likely than non-depleted participants to expose themselves to the temptation to cheat, thereby aggravating the effects of depletion on cheating (Experiment 2). Results indicate that dishonesty increases when people's capacity to exert self-control is impaired, and that people may be particularly vulnerable to this effect because they do not predict it.

Copyright/Permission Statement

© 2009 Elsevier. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Keywords

dishonesty, self-control, motivation, prosocial behavior

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Date Posted: 25 October 2018

This document has been peer reviewed.