Marketing Papers

Document Type

Technical Report

Date of this Version

4-2007

Publication Source

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

Volume

92

Issue

4

Start Page

585

Last Page

595

DOI

10.1037/0022-3514.92.4.585

Abstract

The results of 5 studies showed that people see others as more conforming than themselves. This asymmetry was found to occur in domains ranging from consumer purchases to political views. Participants claimed to be less susceptible than their average peers to broad descriptions of social influences, and they also claimed to be less susceptible than specific peers to specific instances of conformity. These studies further demonstrated that this asymmetry is not simply the result of social desirability, but it is also rooted in people's attention to introspective versus behavioral information when making conformity assessments. The participants displayed an introspection illusion, placing more weight on introspective evidence of conformity (relative to behavioral evidence) when judging their own susceptibility to social influence as opposed to someone else's. Implications for self–other asymmetries, implicit social influence, and interpersonal conflict are discussed.

Copyright/Permission Statement

© American Psychological Association, 2007. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. Please do not copy or cite without author's permission. The final article is available, upon publication, at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.92.4.585.

Keywords

conformity, social influence, self-perception, introspection illusion, actor-observer

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Date Posted: 15 June 2018

This document has been peer reviewed.