Journal Articles (Literacy.org)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

12-2014

Publication Source

Prospects

Volume

44

Issue

4

Start Page

627

Last Page

638

DOI

10.1007/s11125-014-9328-8

Abstract

United Nations development goals have consistently placed a high priority on the quality of education—and of learning. This has led to substantive increases in international development assistance to education, and also to broader attention, worldwide, to the importance of children’s learning. Yet, such goals are mainly normative: they tend to be averages across nations, with relatively limited attention to variations within countries. This review provides an analysis of the scientific tensions in understanding learning among poor and marginalized populations: those at the bottom of the pyramid (BOP). While international agencies such as UNESCO and OECD often invoke these populations as the “target” of their investments and assessments, serious debates continue around the empirical science involved in both research and policy. The present analysis concludes that the UN post-2015 development goals must take into account the critical need to focus on learning among the poor in order to adequately address social and economic inequalities.

Copyright/Permission Statement

This is a pre-publication version. The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11125-014-9328-8

Keywords

learning, low- and middle-income countries, poor and marginalized populations, learning outcomes, constraints, comparability, education policy

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Date Posted:03 July 2018

This document has been peer reviewed.