Journal Articles (Literacy.org)

Document Type

Review

Date of this Version

1978

Publication Source

Keystone Folklore

Volume

22

Start Page

103

Last Page

105

Abstract

The use of narrative and other prose forms as a tool for investigating mental processes is not new. Psychologists such as Jean Piaget and F.C. Bartlett both used stories in research on complex cognitive skills in children and adults. However, with the advent of Ebbinghaus' monumental work on memory using "non-sense syllables," theoretical psychology turned away from the use of meaningful material. With the use of nonsense syllables, researchers hoped to isolate the variables of memory and individual content associations. Recently, there has been a renewal of interest in the study of narrative and memory due to the recognition that narrative taps certain processes that syllables and isolated words do not. In addition, narrative and memory studies have generated interest among those researchers concerned with the applicability of memory studies to educational settings.

Copyright/Permission Statement

Originally published in Keystone Folklore, which has since ceased, by the Pennsylvania Folklore Society.

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Date Posted: 25 April 2018