Journal Articles (Literacy.org)

Document Type

Review

Date of this Version

1990

Publication Source

Contemporary Psychology

Volume

35

Issue

2

Start Page

131

Last Page

132

Abstract

"What is known about the cognitive functions of other peoples that could enable extant psychology to become more comprehensive, to attain a 'universal' cognitive psychology?" This question was the focus of a 1986 NATO workshop held at Queen's University (Kingston, Ontario, Canada) whose working theme was "indigenous cognition and models of information processing." The primary goal of the present volume, which contains 13 papers, is to bring together evidence from "studies of cognition in those populations that have remained well outside industrialised society: the hunting people, the nomads, and the peasants of the contemporary world" (p. 2). The volume begins wtih a general section that includes papers dealing primarily with theoretical concerns in cross-cultural cognitive psychology and continues with four studies among African populations and with three among Native American populations.

Copyright/Permission Statement

Originally published in Contemporary Psychology by the American Psychological Association. The journal has since ceased.

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Date Posted: 25 April 2018

This document has been peer reviewed.