Legal Studies and Business Ethics Papers

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

10-2009

Publication Source

Journal of Business Ethics

Volume

88

Issue

Supplement 4

Start Page

805

Last Page

813

DOI

10.1007/s10551-009-0320-9

Abstract

Corruption presents an assurance problem to businesses: all businesses are best off if none act corruptly but in the event that corruption occurs are better off if they act corruptly than if they do not, and because there is no assurance that other actors are not cheating a business does not know how to act. The usual solution to an assurance problem – criminal sanctions imposed on cheaters – does not work in a corrupt system. Integrative Social Contract Theory suggests a solution to the assurance problem. Application of Integrative Social Contract Theory to corruption demonstrates that in the case of corruption it has advantages over international law, and that the theory’s elegance lies in its recognition of norms generated by multiple communities.

Copyright/Permission Statement

This is a pre-publication version. The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10551-009-0320-9.

Keywords

corruption, Integrative Social Contract Theory, international law, microsocial contracts

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Date Posted: 20 June 2018

This document has been peer reviewed.