Research Briefs

Date of this Version

5-25-2018

Abstract

In a trial examining five approaches to smoking cessation among over 6,000 U.S. employees, financial incentives combined with free cessation aids were more effective at getting employees to stop smoking than free cessation aids alone. Specifically, the most effective intervention (free cessation aids plus $600 in redeemable funds) helped 2.9% of participants stop smoking through six months after their target quit date; this rate jumped to 12.7% among participants who actively engaged in the trial and were more motivated to quit. For employees with access to usual care (information and a free motivational text messaging service), offering free cessation aids or electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) did not help them quit smoking.

Document Type

Brief

Number

40

License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Keywords

smoking cessation, employee wellness, smoking cessation aids, e-cigarettes, electronic cigarettes

Citation For This Study

Halpern, SD, Harhay MO, Saulsgiver K, Brophy C, Troxel AB, & Volpp KG. A Pragmatic Trial of E-Cigarettes, Incentives, and Drugs for Smoking Cessation. New England Journal of Medicine, May 2018. doi:10.1056/NEJMsa1715757

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Date Posted: 01 June 2018