Research Briefs

Date of this Version

1-30-2018

Abstract

Setting a low quantity of opioid tablets as the default option in electronic medical record prescribing orders may “nudge” clinicians to prescribe fewer opioids. When two emergency departments implemented a 10-tablet default instead of a manual entry, the proportion of 10-tablet prescriptions written more than doubled, from 20.6% to 43.3%. Conversely, 20-tablet prescriptions decreased from 22.8% to 16.1%, and prescriptions for 11-19 tablets decreased from 33.5% to 20.1%.

Document Type

Brief

Number

34

License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Keywords

Opioids, opioid epidemic, prescribing, emergency department, electronic medical record, behavioral economics, nudge

Citation For This Study

Delgado, M.K, F.S. Shofer, M.S. Patel, S. Halpern S., E. Christopher, Z.M. Meisel, J. Perrone. Association between Electronic Medical Record Implementation of Default Opioid Prescription Quantities and Prescribing Behavior in Two Emergency Departments. Journal of General Internal Medicine. 2018. doi: 10.1007/s11606-017-4286-5

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Date Posted: 07 February 2018