Departmental Papers (Historic Preservation)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

January 1984

Comments

Reprinted from Bulletin of the Association for Preservation Technology, Volume 16, Issue 3/4, National Park Service, 1984, pages 39-51.

At the time of publication, the author was affiliated with Columbia University. Currently, February 2008, he is a faculty member in the Historic Preservation Program at the University of Pennsylvania.

We have contacted the publisher regarding the deposit of this paper in ScholarlyCommons@Penn. No response has been received.

Abstract

To commemorate the naval victory of Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry during the War of 1812, a monument known as Perry's Victory and International Peace Memorial was planned and erected on South Bass Island in Lake Erie. Begun in 1912 in the centennial year of Perry's victorious battle, the winning design was a massive Doric column of granite and concrete set in a stepped plaza. Completed in 1915, the memorial remains the largest Doric column actually built. In August of 1981, a conservation study of the memorial column was conducted by the North Atlantic Historic Preservation Center, National Park Service, to evaluate potential techniques for the cleaning of the exterior granite surfaces and to provide information for long-term monitoring of the ambient and internal wall conditions of the column. In order to achieve these goals, an evaluation program was developed based on archival research, field testing, and laboratory analysis for the selection of the most appropriate cleaning and monitoring methods.

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Date Posted: 07 February 2008

This document has been peer reviewed.