Document Type

Conference Paper

Date of this Version

1989

Publication Source

CCAR Yearbook

Volume

99

Start Page

78

Last Page

85

Abstract

Any discussion of the Reform rabbinate and the academic study of Judaism presupposes some distinct notion of the primary function of a rabbi, as well as a clear definition of what Torah means in the context of our contemporary community and the new settings in which Jewish learning are presently located. Admittedly, both definitions that I offer are subjective and incomplete and arise from my own unique situation of being both an academic scholar and a Reform rabbi, as well as the son of a Reform rabbi.

Copyright/Permission Statement

Originally published in the CCAR Yearbook by the Central Conference of American Rabbis (CCAR) © 1989. https://ccarnet.org/. Reproduced with permission.

Comments

At the time of this publication, Dr. Ruderman was affiliated with Yale University, but he is now a faculty member at the University of Pennsylvania.

 

Date Posted: 02 August 2017