Health Care Management Papers

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

5-28-2015

Publication Source

The New England Journal of Medicine

Volume

372

Issue

22

Start Page

2108

Last Page

2117

DOI

10.1056/NEJMoa1414293

Abstract

Background

Financial incentives promote many health behaviors, but effective ways to deliver health incentives remain uncertain.

Methods

We randomly assigned CVS Caremark employees and their relatives and friends to one of four incentive programs or to usual care for smoking cessation. Two of the incentive programs targeted individuals, and two targeted groups of six participants. One of the individual-oriented programs and one of the group-oriented programs entailed rewards of approximately $800 for smoking cessation; the others entailed refundable deposits of $150 plus $650 in reward payments for successful participants. Usual care included informational resources and free smoking-cessation aids.

Results

Overall, 2538 participants were enrolled. Of those assigned to reward-based programs, 90.0% accepted this assignment, as compared with 13.7% of those assigned to deposit-based programs (P

Conclusions

Reward-based programs were much more commonly accepted than deposit-based programs, leading to higher rates of sustained abstinence from smoking. Group-oriented incentive programs were no more effective than individual-oriented programs.

Copyright/Permission Statement

From The New England Journal of Medicine, Halpern, S.D., French, B., Small, D.S., Saulsgiver, K., Harhay, M.O., Audrain-McGovern, J., Loewenstein, G., Brennan, T.A., Asch, D.A., & Volpp, K.G. Randomized Trial of Four Financial-Incentive Programs for Smoking Cessation, vol. 372, 2108-2117. Copyright © 2015 Massachusetts Medical Society. Reprinted with permission.

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Date Posted: 27 November 2017

This document has been peer reviewed.