Health Care Management Papers

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

7-2008

Publication Source

Epidemiology and infection

Volume

136

Issue

7

Start Page

913

Last Page

921

DOI

10.1017/S0950268807009387

Abstract

Hospital-level predictors of high rates of 'Clostridium difficile-associated disease' (CDAD) were evaluated in over 2300 hospitals across California, Arizona, and Minnesota. American Hospital Association data were used to determine hospital characteristics associated with high rates of CDAD. Significant correlations were found between hospital rates of CDAD, common infections and other identified pathogens. Hospitals in urban areas had higher average rates of CDAD; yet, irrespective of geographic location, hospital rates of CDAD were associated with other infections. In addition, hospitals with 'high CDAD' rates had slower turnover of beds and were more likely to offer transplant services. These results reveal large differences in rates of CDAD across regions. Hospitals with high rates of CDAD have high rates of other common infections, suggesting a need for broad infection control policies.

Copyright/Permission Statement

Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

Comments

At the time of publication, author Robert J Town was affiliated with the University of Minnesota. Currently, he is a faculty member at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.

Keywords

Arizona, California, clostridium difficile, cross infection, enterocolitis, pseudomembranous, geography, hospitals, humans, Minnesota, risk factors, urban population

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Date Posted: 27 November 2017

This document has been peer reviewed.