GSE Publications

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

1998

Publication Source

Planning for Higher Education

Volume

27

Start Page

30

Last Page

36

Abstract

A fact of academic life is that faculty and presidents primarily concern themselves with different institutional tasks, attend different institutional meetings, and pursue different institutional goals. In short, faculty do "faculty things" and presidents do "presidential things." They have different perceptions of institutional life (Peterson and White 1992). Differing perspectives can easily lead to standoffs between the two powers in academe—those who teach and those who administer—and those standoffs happen quite frequently (American Council on Education & Pew Higher Education Roundtable 1996; Schuster et al. 1994). Faculty-administrator differences are not a new phenomenon; examples exist at Williams and Dartmouth Colleges from 100 years ago (Finkelstein 1984).

Copyright/Permission Statement

Originally published in Planning for Higher Education © 1998 SCUP. Reproduced with permission.

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Date Posted: 25 August 2018