GSE Publications

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

1-1-2006

Publication Source

Journal of Language, Identity & Education

Volume

5

Issue

4

Start Page

277

Last Page

292

DOI

10.1207/s15327701jlie0504_2

Abstract

This article considers instances of biliterate educational practice in contexts of indigenous language revitalization involving Quechua in the South American Andes, Guarani in Paraguay, and Maori in Aotearoa/NewZealand. In these indigenous contexts of sociohistorical and sociolinguistic oppression, the implementation of multilingual language policies through multilingual education brings with it choices, dilemmas, and even contradictions in educational practice. I consider examples of such contentious educational practices from an ecological perspective, using the continua of biliteracy and the notion of voice as analytical heuristics. I suggest that the biliterate use of indigenous children's own or heritage language as medium of instruction alongside the dominant language mediates the dialogism, meaning-making, access to wider discourses, and taking of an active stance that are dimensions of voice. Indigenous voices thus activated can be a powerful force for both enhancing the children's own learning and promoting the maintenance and revitalization of their languages.

Copyright/Permission Statement

This is an Author's Accepted Manuscript of an article published in the Journal of Language, Identity, and Education, 5(4), 277-292. Copyright Taylor & Francis, available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1207/s15327701jlie0504_2

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Keywords

Bolivia, Peru, ecology of language, language maintenance, language policy, multilingual education

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Date Posted: 22 January 2008

This document has been peer reviewed.