Finance Papers

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

6-2014

Publication Source

Journal of Housing Economics

Volume

24

Start Page

4

Last Page

20

DOI

10.1016/j.jhe.2014.01.001

Abstract

The impact of borrowing constraints on homeownership has been well established in the literature. Wealth is most likely to restrict homeownership followed by credit and income. Using recent movers from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and borrowing constraint definitions commonly used in the literature, we examine the impact of these constraints on the probability of homeownership during the housing market boom between 2003 and 2007. We show that whereas the pool of financially constrained households expanded, the marginal impact of borrowing constraints associated with income and credit quality declined during this period. The constraint associated with wealth, however, continued to have a negative impact on homeownership status, all else equal. The fact that lending standards became less strict is accepted; however the impact of this on homeownership has not been previously studied. Here we find that less restrictive underwriting does appear to have reduced the impact of income and credit quality on homeownership but the impact of the wealth constraint persists.

Copyright/Permission Statement

© 2014. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Keywords

tenure choice, borrowing constraint, credit constraint, mortgage supply, homeownership, credit bubble

Embargo Date

1-21-2016

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Date Posted: 27 November 2017

This document has been peer reviewed.