Departmental Papers (EES)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

6-2011

Publication Source

Geophysical Research Letters

Volume

38

Issue

11

Start Page

L11405

DOI

10.1029/2011GL047118

Abstract

Erosion and deposition rates estimated from the stratigraphic record frequently exhibit a power-law dependence on measurement interval. This dependence can result from a power-law distribution of stratigraphic hiatuses. By representing the stratigraphic filter as a stochastic process called a reverse ascending ladder, we describe a likely origin of power-law hiatuses, and thus, rate scaling. While power-law hiatuses in certain environments can be a direct result of power-law periods of stasis (no deposition or erosion), they are more generally the result of randomness in surface fluctuations irrespective of mean subsidence or uplift. Autocorrelation in fluctuations can make hiatuses more or less heavy-tailed, but still exhibit power-law characteristics. In addition we show that by passing stratigraphic data backward through the filter, certain statistics of surface kinematics from their formative environments can be inferred.

Copyright/Permission Statement

Copyright © 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

Keywords

deposition, erosion, hiatus, landscape evolution, power-law, stratigraphy

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Date Posted: 11 November 2016

This document has been peer reviewed.