Comparing client characteristics, services, and outcomes of women in specialized and conventional drug treatment

Lani Lee Nelson-Zlupko, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

Qualitative and quantitative methods were combined to explore the outcomes of 208 women in one women-specialized and one conventional drug treatment program in Philadelphia. Findings suggest that specialized treatment may be more effective in treating women. While women were retained longer in the conventional program, women in the specialized program utilized more services, reported higher levels of progress in treatment, and achieved abstinence earlier. Further, women in both programs overwhelmingly perceived specialized services to be more helpful to their recovery. Across programs, women with histories of psychiatric illness, legal conviction, and physical and sexual abuse performed less well in treatment than their peers. Idiosyncratic program operations are believed to have significantly influenced the outcome trends in this study; and, as such, careful attention is given to those program characteristics which may positively and negatively impact upon women clients. Recommendations for treatment and research are presented.

Subject Area

Social work|Mental health|Public health|Womens studies

Recommended Citation

Nelson-Zlupko, Lani Lee, "Comparing client characteristics, services, and outcomes of women in specialized and conventional drug treatment" (1996). Dissertations available from ProQuest. AAI9627972.
https://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI9627972

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