Racial socialization: The effectiveness of the transmission of messages about race by Black parents to their college-aged children

Rhonda Felece Jeter, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

In the process of socializing their children, parents pass on values, attitudes, and prejudices (Roediger, Rushton, & Capaidi, 1975). In addition to basic socialization, Black parents must also pass on information about what it means to be Black and how to cope with racism in this society. In the past this information was transmitted both implicitly and explicitly by Black parents, the extended family, and formal community structures. Today, many upwardly mobile parents are leaving Black communities with the result that the responsibility to prepare Black children to cope with contemporary society falls more exclusively on the parents. This study assessed how well parents have taught their college aged children about race and racism by comparing the responses of parent and child on the Jeter Assessment of Racial Socialization Scale, the Racial Identity Scale, and Interviews. The results indicated that the children indeed received the messages that the parents had intended about race and racism.

Subject Area

Educational psychology|Families & family life|Personal relationships|Sociology|Minority & ethnic groups|Sociology|African Americans

Recommended Citation

Jeter, Rhonda Felece, "Racial socialization: The effectiveness of the transmission of messages about race by Black parents to their college-aged children" (1995). Dissertations available from ProQuest. AAI9532211.
https://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI9532211

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