AN EVALUATION OF MOTORCYCLE SAFETY EDUCATION IN THREE SOUTHCENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA COUNTIES

ROBERT ALLEN LEASE, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

The primary purpose of the study was to describe the Motorcycle Rider Course participant and to investigate the effectiveness of motorcycle safety education in three southcentral Pennsylvania counties. The study examined biographic and demographic variables, motor cycle riding characteristics of the participants, the differences between the accident/violation records of the participants and those of the self-taught motorcyclists in southcentral Pennsylvania. In the spring of 1984, a survey of their Motorcycle Rider Course participants in Lancaster, Lebanon and York counties was conducted. The subjects for this study were 100 Motorcycle Rider Course participants randomly selected from a total population of 666 Motorcycle Rider Course participants in the same three counties. Biographic, demographic and motorcycle riding characteristics data were collected on a survey sheet developed jointly by Millersville University's School of Continuing Education and the Pennsylvania Motorcycle Safety Program Director. The study also examined accident data obtained from the accident/violation records data obtained from the Highway Safety Center, Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. The 100 randomly selected Motorcycle Rider Course participants' accident/violation records were compared to 100 randomly selected self-taught motor cyclists from the same three counties. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to ascertain if there were significant differences between the two groups. The results of the study indicate four findings. First, the Motorcycle Rider Course participants were generally in the 30-49 age group, married individuals, white, and presented an even distribution of males and females. Secondly, the Motorcycle Rider Course participants were found to reside in the suburbs, were high school graduates or attended college, held a professional/technical job, and had an income over $20,000. Thirdly, the participants generally own or intend to purchase a motorcycle, rode motorcycles infrequently and generally rode smaller motorcycles under 450cc. The participants stated their commitment to wearing proper riding gear. Fourthly, the incidence of accidents was greater for both groups of motorcyclists who travelled further, younger riders, and male riders. Motorcyclists who rode larger motorcycles had greater violation involvement. Finally, even with distance travelled, age, sex, and engine size controlled, the participants had a lower incidence of traffic accident/violations than self-taught motorcyclists. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.)

Subject Area

Higher education

Recommended Citation

LEASE, ROBERT ALLEN, "AN EVALUATION OF MOTORCYCLE SAFETY EDUCATION IN THREE SOUTHCENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA COUNTIES" (1986). Dissertations available from ProQuest. AAI8624389.
https://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI8624389

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