STUDENT, FACULTY, AND COMMUNITY PERCEPTIONS OF THE EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES PROGRAM AT THE MECHANICSBURG AREA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL (PENNSYLVANIA)

LLOYD RUSSEL KRAMER, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

Descriptive research was used to determine student, faculty, parent, and community perceptions of the over-all activity program from one particular school. Student and faculty questionnaires and interviews with parents and board of education members were the methods used to collect data. In addition, a cost analysis of each activity was completed to determine the per-participant expenditures for each activity and the per-pupil expenditures for each student enrolled in the school. The study revealed there was a large measure of student, teacher, parent, and board support for school activities. In addition, there was evidence to show that the program was successfully meeting the needs of the large number of students who were participants. The study also provided additional information to show that many students who were involved with activities possessed certain characteristics to a greater extent than non-participants including: better grades, more extensive post-high school educational plans, and a willingness to devote large amounts of time and personal money to a worthwhile program. In addition, some of the reasons students participated in activities were to experience fun and personal enjoyment, to broaden personal and social contacts, and to have an outlet for individual needs. However, many students believed the existing program may not be meeting the needs of non-conforming students. Seniors were the group of students who had the highest percentage of non-participants. Reasons for lack of participation included: not being selected, scheduling conflicts, low grades, activities controlled by cliques, and irrelevant activities. Although many teachers were generally supportive and involved, the major differences between sponsors and non-sponsors were age, experience, and a willingness to devote time to school activities. As a result, school officials need to understand that as faculty members become older and more experienced, they seem to be reluctant to serve as activity advisers. The total school activity budget was costly, and first impressions may have reflected excessiveness and inappropriate use of available resources. However, a detailed cost analysis of the entire activity program showed that on a per-participant and per-pupil basis, activities were not expensive and should continue to be fully funded as they provided opportunities for hundreds of students at a relatively low cost.

Subject Area

School administration

Recommended Citation

KRAMER, LLOYD RUSSEL, "STUDENT, FACULTY, AND COMMUNITY PERCEPTIONS OF THE EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES PROGRAM AT THE MECHANICSBURG AREA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL (PENNSYLVANIA)" (1985). Dissertations available from ProQuest. AAI8611016.
https://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI8611016

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