THE MASTER OF THE LEGEND OF SAINT LUCY: A CATALOGUE AND CRITICAL ESSAY (BELGIUM)

ANN MICHELLE ROBERTS, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

By inventing the Master of the Legend of Saint Lucy in 1902, Max Friedlander identified a body of work by the hand of this anonymous artist. By 1928, Friedlander had assembled the first catalogue--twenty-two objects--of the artist's works. Since then, the oeuvre has almost been doubled.^ After an introduction tracing the growth of the oeuvre, the present study begins by reviewing the paintings to reassess their relationship to the author of the Legend of Saint Lucy in Saint James' Church in Bruges. The characteristics of the artist's hand are extracted from this eponymous painting and a small group of closely related paintings. These characteristics and broader stylistic considerations determine a catalogue of works assignable to the Lucy Master that is smaller, yet more cohesive than previous catalogues. They also permit the identification of an assistant's hand. Some questionable paintings are removed from the Lucy Master's oeuvre, while several paintings and some drawings are newly assigned to him.^ The second chapter is concerned with a chronology of the Lucy Master's paintings, as established by both in- and extrinsic evidence. From the chronology, an assessment is made of his stylistic development.^ Chapter three reviews the many borrowings which appear in this eclectic artist's works and concludes with observations about his training.^ The question of Spanish influence and patronage is discussed in chapter four. One--and possibly two--trips to Spain by the Lucy Master are projected. Certain relationships with Italian art and patronage are also considered.^ In the final chapter, an hypothesis is offered about the identity of the Lucy Master. What may be deduced about the life of the Lucy Master is compared to the life of an artist known only in documents. The circumstantial evidence is bolstered by stylistic similarities between the Lucy Master's paintings and a sculptural ensemble on which his proposed alter ego--Jan de Hervy-- is known to have worked.^ The study concludes with two appendices: a catalogue raisonne of the Lucy Master's paintings and the documents reconstructing the life of Jan de Hervy. ^

Subject Area

Fine Arts

Recommended Citation

ROBERTS, ANN MICHELLE, "THE MASTER OF THE LEGEND OF SAINT LUCY: A CATALOGUE AND CRITICAL ESSAY (BELGIUM)" (1982). Dissertations available from ProQuest. AAI8307355.
https://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI8307355

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