The National Collegiate Athletic Association self-study certification process: A waste of time and money, a necessary evil or a worthwhile exercise?

Suzanne J Wasiolek, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

This dissertation is designed as a follow-up to a 1993 study in which athletic directors at Division I schools were surveyed to assess their attitudes towards the NCAA self-study certification process before the process was actually implemented. The dissertation addresses five research questions. First, what are the perceptions of presidents/chancellors, faculty athletics representatives and athletic directors at Division I schools of the NCAA in the role of accrediting agency for intercollegiate athletics? Second, what do presidents/chancellors, faculty athletics representatives and athletics directors at Division I schools consider the goals and key issues to be addressed by the NCAA self-study certification process? Third, how do presidents/chancellors, athletic directors and faculty athletics representatives at Division I schools perceive the NCAA self-study certification process to have influenced intercollegiate athletics? Fourth, how do perceptions of the NCAA self-study certification process vary based on attributes of the respondent and characteristics of the institution? Fifth, what are the forces that contribute to perceptions about the NCAA self-study certification process on two selected campuses? The current study uses a mixed methods approach and includes a survey of all athletic directors as well as presidents/chancellors and faculty athletics representatives at Division I schools to assess their perceptions of the effectiveness of the NCAA self-study certification process since its implementation. Comparisons of selected attributes as well as certain institutional characteristics are made, using factor analysis and regression. In addition to the survey, a qualitative analysis provides a more in-depth look at the dynamics that influence these perceptions at two Division I institutions. Leadership position, perception of the current state of intercollegiate athletics, and NCAA Division I status all serve as predictors of how the effectiveness of the self-study certification process is perceived. This study will provide to the NCAA, the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics, leaders in higher education and critics of intercollegiate athletic programs a better understanding of how the NCAA self-study certification process is perceived by those who have been engaged in the process, almost 25 years after it was launched. The results will serve to inform the NCAA as it moves forward in evaluating whether the certification process should be continued, modified or abandoned.

Subject Area

Higher education

Recommended Citation

Wasiolek, Suzanne J, "The National Collegiate Athletic Association self-study certification process: A waste of time and money, a necessary evil or a worthwhile exercise?" (2008). Dissertations available from ProQuest. AAI3310493.
https://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI3310493

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