Organizational climate and hospital nurses' job satisfaction, burnout, and intent to leave

Pamela J Jackson-Malik, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

This study investigated hospital nurses' perceptions of organizational climate measured by the Revised Nurse Work Index and aggregated to the hospital level in relation to job outcomes. The specific organizational climate features examined were resource adequacy, support for employees, nurse-physician relationship, and management practices; the job outcome variables were job satisfaction, burnout, and intent to leave. A secondary analysis of data from nearly 2,400 nurses across 22 acute-care hospitals known for superior clinical practice environments was conducted. The organizational climate features of resource adequacy, support for employees, and management practices were highly associated with nurse job satisfaction, burnout, and intent to leave. Nurse-physician relations were a significant predictor of job outcomes before and after adjustment for nurse characteristics and staffing. Management practices were the most consistent organizational climate predictor of all three of the job outcome variables. These findings provide support for addressing organizational climate factors as a means of reducing dissatisfaction, burnout, and turnover.

Subject Area

Nursing|Management

Recommended Citation

Jackson-Malik, Pamela J, "Organizational climate and hospital nurses' job satisfaction, burnout, and intent to leave" (2005). Dissertations available from ProQuest. AAI3165703.
https://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI3165703

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