Master's degree highly desired: Measuring the increase in productivity due to master's education in the United States Navy

Julie Dougherty Filizetti, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

Can the value of a Master's degree be measured? The value of education is generally thought of in terms of returns to an individual, namely a higher salary, greater promotion opportunity, or a better. Yet, for an organization to be willing to pay higher salaries for people with more education, there must some increase in productivity associated with Master's level education. This dissertation develops a way to measure that productivity using the United States Navy as a model. A survey that asks people who have observed and supervised people with and without Master's degrees to distinguish differences in productivity between these two groups is designed. Productivity is defined in terms of the outcomes expected of education. The survey consists of ten scenarios that demonstrate mastery of these expected outcomes and asking supervisors how capable officers are of making the decision or performing the tasks in each scenario. Pairs of officers are then asked to answer the survey about officers in their organization. This provides a measure of the reliability of the survey. This research is largely exploratory in nature. It seeks to provide a better understanding of productivity gains associated with Master's level education and test the feasibility of undertaking a more extensive study.

Subject Area

Higher education

Recommended Citation

Filizetti, Julie Dougherty, "Master's degree highly desired: Measuring the increase in productivity due to master's education in the United States Navy" (2003). Dissertations available from ProQuest. AAI3084876.
https://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI3084876

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