Asian American Students in Independent Schools: Stereotypes, Myths, and Relationships with Other Students of Color

Matthew Joe Michio Suzuki, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

Asian American students comprise the largest subgroup of students of color in independent schools in the United States. This study examined the experiences of Asian American students in a co-educational, Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12, independent day school in a suburban setting. This study explored the roles that stereotypes and myths play in these students’ experiences of navigating life in an independent school and dealing with the phenomena of the model minority myth and Asian advantage or privilege. Additionally, this study looked into the relationships between Asian American students and other students of color within the school community. Data for this study were collected through a qualitative analysis using three sources: a survey questionnaire, one-to-one interviews, and a focus group. Through this study, I endeavored to understand better the experiences of this growing population of students in independent schools, and, more importantly, garner information about their encounters with faculty and students that will better inform independent school leaders and educators to support them.

Subject Area

Educational administration|Asian American Studies

Recommended Citation

Suzuki, Matthew Joe Michio, "Asian American Students in Independent Schools: Stereotypes, Myths, and Relationships with Other Students of Color" (2020). Dissertations available from ProQuest. AAI27995102.
https://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI27995102

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