Departmental Papers (Dental)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

7-2008

Publication Source

Oral Diseases

Volume

14

Issue

5

Start Page

428

Last Page

434

DOI

10.1111/j.1601-0825.2007.01396.x

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) are a population of highly proliferative postnatal stem cells capable of differentiating into odontoblasts, adipocytes, neural cells, and osteo-inductive cells. To examine whether SHED-mediated bone regeneration can be utilized for therapeutic purposes, we used SHED to repair critical-size calvarial defects in immuno-compromised mice.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

We generated calvarial defects and transplanted SHED with hydroxyapatite/ tricalcium phosphate as a carrier into the defect areas.

RESULTS

SHED were able to repair the defects with substantial bone formation. Interestingly, SHED-mediated osteogenesis failed to recruit hematopoietic marrow elements that are commonly seen in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-generated bone. Furthermore, SHED were found to co-express mesenchymal stem cell marker, CC9/MUC18/CD146, with an array of growth factor receptors such as transforming growth factor β receptor I and II, fibroblast growth factor receptor I and III, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor I, implying their comprehensive differentiation potential.

CONCLUSIONS

Our data indicate that SHED, derived from neural crest cells, may select unique mechanisms to exert osteogenesis. SHED might be a suitable resource for orofacial bone regeneration.

Copyright/Permission Statement

This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [Seo, B., Sonoyama, W., Yamaza, T., Coppe, C., Kikuiri, T., Akiyama, K., . . . Shi, S. (2008). SHED repair critical‐size calvarial defects in mice. Oral Diseases, 14(5), 428-434. doi:10.1111/j.1601-0825.2007.01396.x], which has been published in final form at [http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1601-0825.2007.01396.x]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.

Comments

At the time of publication, author Songtao Shi was affiliated with the University of Southern California. Currently, he is a faculty member at the School of Dental Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Keywords

stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), osteoblast, regeneration, bone

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Date Posted: 01 March 2022

This document has been peer reviewed.