Departmental Papers (City and Regional Planning)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

January 2007

Comments

Reprinted from Idaho Law Review, Volume 43, 2007, pages 475-503.

Abstract

It is widely but not universally held that more roads mean more traffic. In spite of this evidence we are continually seduced by the notion that we can zone for low density to preclude traffic from occurring, that we can move far away from traffic that we can avoid it, and/or that we can build our way out of traffic. This low density race to the edge results in the ill-defined but expensive condition of sprawl. In a counter vein, New Urbanists, Advocates of Transit Oriented Development (TOD), and smart growth advocates have embraced the notion that traffic has always been with us and is here to stay, but we can make the most of our activity spaces by concentrating development, arresting the creation of new roads, and investing wisely in high capacity transportation systems.

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Date Posted: 09 November 2007

This document has been peer reviewed.